Buy propecia Online

September 1, 2009

Living In A Technological Culture [8:02 am]

One more version of privacy that we can hardly name, much less have a meaningful policy discussion about. Although, let’s do give credit when a topic like this gets a few column inches: A Casualty of the Technology Revolution - ‘Locational Privacy’ (pdf)

When I woke up the other day, I went straight to my computer to catch up on the news and read e-mail. About 20 minutes later, I walked half a block to the gym, where I exercised for 45 minutes. I took the C train to The New York Times building, and then at the end of the day, I was back on the C train. I had dinner on my friends Elisabeth and Dan’s rooftop, then walked home seven blocks.

I’m not giving away any secrets here — nothing I did was secret to begin with. Verizon online knows when I logged on, and New York Sports Club knows when I swiped my membership card. The M.T.A. could trace through the MetroCard I bought with a credit card when and where I took the subway, and The Times knows when I used my ID to enter the building. AT&T could follow me along the way through my iPhone.

[...] A little-appreciated downside of the technology revolution is that, mainly without thinking about it, we have given up “locational privacy.” Even in low-tech days, our movements were not entirely private. The desk attendant at my gym might have recalled seeing me, or my colleagues might have remembered when I arrived. Now the information is collected automatically and often stored indefinitely.

[...] The idea of constantly monitoring the citizenry’s movements used to conjure up images of totalitarian states. Now, technology does the surveillance — generally in the name of being helpful. It’s time for a serious conversation about how much of our privacy of movement we want to give up.

permalink to just this entry

October 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
posts

0.116 || Powered by WordPress