December 16, 2007

Is The “Cloud” The Future? [2:12 pm]

This article seems to think so: Google Gets Ready to Rumble With Microsoft

The growing confrontation between Google and Microsoft promises to be an epic business battle. It is likely to shape the prosperity and progress of both companies, and also inform how consumers and corporations work, shop, communicate and go about their digital lives. Google sees all of this happening on remote servers in faraway data centers, accessible over the Web by an array of wired and wireless devices — a setup known as cloud computing. Microsoft sees a Web future as well, but one whose center of gravity remains firmly tethered to its desktop PC software. Therein lies the conflict.

permalink to just this entry

Digital Bullying [2:04 pm]

Megan Meier, adolescence and online anonymity, revisited: When the Bullies Turned Faceless

In some ways, the hoax was a tragic oddity. Most mothers don’t pull vicious pranks, and few harassed adolescents become depressed and commit suicide. But Megan’s story is also a case study about cyberbullying.

Cellphone cameras and text messages, as well as social networking Web sites, e-mail and instant messaging, all give teenagers a wider range of ways to play tricks on one another, to tease and to intimidate their peers.

And unlike traditional bullying, which usually is an intimate, if highly unpleasant, experience, high-tech bullying can happen anywhere, anytime, among lots of different children who may never actually meet in person. It is inescapable and often anonymous, said sociologists and educators who have studied cyberbullying.

If only Wondermark’s explanation of the Internet were more well-distributed

permalink to just this entry

Taking the Easy Way Out [11:59 am]

If we can’t frame our sophistries around defending “the children,” we always have blaming technology. Wider Spying Fuels Aid Plan for Telecom Industry

The federal government’s reliance on private industry has been driven by changes in technology. Two decades ago, telephone calls and other communications traveled mostly through the air, relayed along microwave towers or bounced off satellites. The N.S.A. could vacuum up phone, fax and data traffic merely by erecting its own satellite dishes. But the fiber optics revolution has sent more and more international communications by land and undersea cable, forcing the agency to seek company cooperation to get access.

And while the heart of this assertion is true, it fails to point out that there are many ways that the desired surveillance can be done — and that the (lazy) choice of the easiest method is almost certainly the most brutal when it comes to democratic ideals.

See Glenn Greenwald’s The Lawless Surveillance State

See also Jack Balkin and Sanford Levinson in their paper The Processes of Constitutional Change: From Partisan Entrenchment to the National Surveillance State

permalink to just this entry

December 2007
S M T W T F S
« Nov   Jan »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  
posts

0.158 || Powered by WordPress