Participation in Entertainment Decisions

Adjusting to a new way of doing things: Network fear of the Net as copilotpdf

THE Internet is giving Hollywood a nervous breakdown.

Way, way back in prehistory — let’s say, 2004 — if you made a TV pilot and the network didn’t pick it up, the judge’s decision was final.

But now you have a savior, an ally, a friend with millions of other friends. You have YouTube.

[…] Did Comedy Central blow the call? See for yourself. The entire pilot, in three segments, was posted on YouTube several weeks ago. (To watch, go to YouTube and type in “Three Strikes.”) Whether it is still there after this column appears is another issue, since Viacom, which owns Comedy Central, is suing YouTube’s parent company and has pulled all its shows from the site.

Participation in Entertainment Decisions

Adjusting to a new way of doing things: Network fear of the Net as copilotpdf

THE Internet is giving Hollywood a nervous breakdown.

Way, way back in prehistory — let’s say, 2004 — if you made a TV pilot and the network didn’t pick it up, the judge’s decision was final.

But now you have a savior, an ally, a friend with millions of other friends. You have YouTube.

LATimes Editorial on the Cablevision © Suit

Court can’t see Cablevision for what it ispdf

THE SUPREME COURT ruled more than 20 years ago that recording TV shows on your VCR is legal. Nowadays, technology allows your cable company to essentially keep those shows on its VCR, not yours. Yet a federal court has ruled that this system violates copyright law.

What’s the difference? This is not a case of technology changing behavior. It’s a case of the law failing to adjust to new technology.

See earlier A Replay of the MP3.com Fight